Fender Blonde 6G6-A Bassman

Model/Circuit Number: 6G6-A, 6G6-B
Years of Production:
1962 – 1964
Era: Blond
Configuration: Head and 2×12 Extension Cabinet
Controls: Brown ~ 1962-1963, Black ~ 1963-1964 forward facing w/ white labels, controls numbered 1 – 10
Knobs: White Barrel Knobs
Faceplate:

  • Front: Bass: In, In, Vol, Treb, Bass – Normal: In, In, Vol, Treb, Bass – Presence – Pilot Lamp
  • Rear: Ground Sw, Fuse (3A), Power Sw, Standby Sw, Speaker Jack, Ex. Speaker Jack

Cabinet:

Tolex/Tweed:

Grill Cloth:

Logo: Grill mounted, flat Brown or raised (64), chrome & black, script
Weight:
Speaker:

Effects: None
Watts: 50 watts
Tubes:

  • Pre amp: 4 x 7025
  • Power: 2 x 5881
  • Bias: Fixed; nonadjustable
  • Rectifier: Solid State

Comments:

18 thoughts on “Fender Blonde 6G6-A Bassman

  • May 22, 2014 at 4:51 am
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    Just a quick point here for information sake as that the 6G6 and 6G6A Bassman also came with a single 12″ speaker cabinet in 1961 and early 1962 which should be listed as well. They also came in both tube and Solid State rectifier versions.

    Reply
  • December 1, 2014 at 6:14 am
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    I have 2 Blonde Bassman amps in the shop right now, so I just wanted to add some additional details on handles, logos and grill cloth for these 2 samples.

    1962
    – 6G6-A Circuit
    – Ox Blood Grill Cloth
    – Brown Plastic Dog Bone Handle
    – Flat Logo

    1963
    – 6G6-B Circuit
    – Beige Brown Grill Cloth
    – Black Plastic Handle
    – Raised Chrome & Black Scrip Logo

    Reply
  • July 23, 2015 at 5:10 pm
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    I have a ’64 smooth blonde tolex head and cab. Tube Chart Date NF (June 1964).
    Chassis is ink stamped inside with TC2364 (June ’64),
    Filter cap board stamped FA2064 (May ’64).
    Tube Chart on the 6G6-B label shows 6L6 power tubes, not 5881.
    Also the original cab contains a pair of Utah 12″ stamped 328614.

    Reply
  • February 7, 2018 at 11:26 am
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    My ’63 ser# BP05546 came original with the lower B+ 125P19A PT. I understand a few twins were fitted with 7591’s used that PT. Anything is possible in Fenderland.
    I subbed a 125P7A clone while the original was rewound/reverse engineered but the sound was too clean & stiff for me. When the 125P19A came back so did the incredible tone/feel.
    IHOP a lower B+ with 120+ AC probably mimics the factory spec PT with early 60’s 110V.

    Reply
    • January 17, 2019 at 4:15 pm
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      In reference to your comments about Fender 125P19A power transformer in your Bassman: was the performance you liked when using 6L6 power tubes?

      Reply
  • February 7, 2018 at 11:50 am
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    Edit to above: the rare twin referenced above used 7355 power tubes, not 7591’s. I guess when that twin didn’t work out the PT’s were put in some G6G-B’s.
    If your bassman has the factory spec PT try a variac at 110V…….

    Reply
  • January 21, 2019 at 11:26 am
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    I have a 1962 single speaker 12 in Jensen 1220 speakerneed handles dog bone handle and strap 4 5/8 in your suggestion

    Reply
  • March 23, 2019 at 11:28 am
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    Can you think of anybody that LOVES and can bring Bassman amps to Tone heaven? I have a 61 Bassman, that has some weird anomolies, and when i got it, it sounded terrible. After fixing it, my buddy left it with me, but it just doesn’t sound good. It’s spikey, and it sounds…not good.
    Can you think of anybody who can make it sound good.
    My pal put a master volume in it, and put a solid state Rectifier in it, along with a few other weird tweaks, BUT I would let the tech have free rein to “do what needs to be done…”

    Reply
    • April 2, 2019 at 9:52 pm
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      You want someone who can make it sound good? I took my Blond Bassman 6G6-B (Dec, 1963) to Giovanni Loria at Black Volt Amplification in Los Angeles. Stunned at how good it sounds now. Giovanni went through the amp doing what needed to be done. He said someone put in a solid state rectifier, but I told him to leave it in. After he recapped it, etc., he returned my vintage caps, but I’m not touching this thing, it’s perfect.

      Reply
    • May 5, 2019 at 5:28 am
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      I am a Fender amp specialist, with 39 years running my own shop. I can help. I do whats best for the customer and the amp. I play the amps, and frequency sweep them to find anomalous speakers, cabinet hardware, haunted wires, tubes, etc. I have a selection of different sounding preamp tubes (and a website you can hear them), stock the most reliable components, full stock of correct parts. The business is called “Cranky’s”, in Massachusetts, the website is GuitarRepair.com, and you can hear those tubes at “12AX7A.com”. I have excellent reviews even though there is a very long queue. Expedited service is available for a labor premium. I “skid-double box” amps for shipping – never had one damaged.

      Reply
    • May 11, 2019 at 3:33 am
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      I also have a 61 blond/oxblood tube rectified 6G6 amp with original 8-ohm OT
      It had a weird overload/sag issue which rendered the amp unusable at volume. It took a few techs to locate the problem but it was judged as a minor flaw in the original circuit which was probably resolved by Fender as they quickly moved to the 6G6A and 6G6B revisions. It was a simple resistor fix as I recall.
      Personally I would reverse the MV and SS rectifier tweaks as they are not right for that rare edition vintage amp, it sounds superb, tube-rectified when the circuit issue is addressed. I prefer it to the sound of the 6G6B amps I also owned.

      Reply
  • April 2, 2019 at 9:53 pm
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    You want someone who can make it sound good? I took my Blond Bassman 6G6-B (Dec, 1963) to Giovanni Loria at Black Volt Amplification in Los Angeles. Stunned at how good it sounds now. Giovanni went through the amp doing what needed to be done. He said someone put in a solid state rectifier, but I told him to leave it in. After he recapped it, etc., he returned my vintage caps, but I’m not touching this thing, it’s perfect.

    Reply
  • July 10, 2019 at 12:45 pm
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    Daniel,
    Quailfication: I’m a guitar player who likes Beano-type sound in particular. THANKS for what you posted about the 125P19A in your Bassman: I manager to locate an original and swapped it in to replace the 125P7A that was the stock power transformer in the amp. What a difference: it fixed everything that I wasn’t quite in love with about the amp. I had been thinking about selling it because I already have a ’62 Super that was better than this amp, but now this amp is better.

    Reply
  • July 13, 2019 at 7:05 pm
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    Michael,
    Glad to hear the lower B+ PT worked for you. It would be interesting to know how many G6G-B’s came with the 125P19A. I am lucky to own this “happy accident”.

    IMOP both Blonde + BF Bassman’s used for guitar just sound + feel better with a rectified B+ under 440VDC. With the large OT, & 25uf 12AX7 cathode caps after the tone controls these amps are BIG + LOUD.

    The lower B+ tames that, especially for blues players that dig in with a pick & fingers. For the 125P7A PT, use a variac or a Brown Box. Dan

    Reply
    • July 13, 2019 at 7:23 pm
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      When I bought my ’63 it was beat to almost death. There was barely any brown paint on the faceplate, just bashed in bare aluminum. Fortunately, Larry Rodgers provided a repro brown plate before he passed away. RIP.

      The filter cap fiberboard crumbled to pieces. There was so much nicotine & grease on the circuit board you could not read the resistor color bands! Some of the wires under the board corroded green & separated.

      After 3 months of cleaning & getting the PT rewound/reverse engineered, & chasing down bad connections, this ’63 road warrior sounds incredible, & almost no hum! Currently using the Phillips short bottle 6L6WGB’s.

      Reply
    • July 14, 2019 at 12:14 pm
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      Michael,

      Hang onto that Super. It’s been reported that Brothers Duane & Dickey used a brown Super for the guitar solos on “Blue Sky”. Those 10’s must have been really cooking!

      Reply

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